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Reviews

With his dry, droll, vivid storytelling, Will Sergeant makes very clear the factors that shaped him, and therefore his band, into such a unique force . . . Sergeant sharply evokes the neurotic importance of music and clothes, his relief at seeing light alter so much darkness especially palpable in the aftermath of his new band's first gig
Keith Cameron, Mojo
Sergeant's acerbic sense of humour in the telling of these tales means the memoir sometimes reads as if you're in the pub with him . . . Bunnyman manages to do what Echo & the Bunnymen did so brilliantly: be part of a wider story but create an autonomous enclave within it, subject to almost magical laws and precedents
Louder Than War
Engagingly down-to-earth . . . fondly nostalgic picture of 1960s and 70s Merseyside
Classic Rock
Evocative
Irish Times
Wonderfully vivid . . . brings to life an ordinary suburban existence and how music can offer new dreams and visions . . . fascinating . . . His pre-Bunnymen musical experiences are hilarious and self-deprecating
Caught By The River
An engaging coming-of-age story
Ian Rankin, New Statesman
Wonderful . . . an evocative ride through childhood and teenage years . . . Sergeant writes with such atmosphere you can practically smell the chimney smoke and hear the rattle of glass bottles on milk floats . . . It's all recounted with generous helpings of the author's dry wit, as sharp and seductive as the innovative guitar lines he's contributed to so many great records
Record Collector
Will's story is peppered with evocative detail of growing up in the 60s and 70s . . . a strikingly honest journey . . . Bunnyman is an enthralling and funny book which, simply by coming from an insider's perspective (probably THE insider), throws new light on the birth of the Bunnymen
Manic Pop Thrills
Sergeant's memoir takes an earthy stroll through his early years, unafraid to tell it like it was
Mail on Sunday